asylum-art:

Daniel Merriam

If Hieronymus Bosch took the blue pill instead and sat down to a mad hatters tea party with Marie Antoinette, a hookah-smoking Caterpillar & a couple of unicorns you may just open the curtain into Daniel Merriam’s theatre fantastic. A Master American Surrealist painter, his worlds speak to those of us who adored the movie The Labyrinth and found ourselves asking, Why the hell wouldn’t she stay with the Goblin King? It’s firmly the territory of a child’s bubblegum mind.

(via ohmanilostmypants)

Daniel merriam art

damianrules:

I said I’d write up a tutorial on how to make these wings. It’ll be terrible So, here goes. XD
Have one or two friends to help you out. It’s easier with more hands.Materials:
Thin poster board. (For small wings you will need 3 pieces. For wings like this you will need 6)
Opal cellophane. (two rolls to be safe)
Adhesive glue.
Scissors.
Wire cutters.
Exacto knife. (I recommended using this for cutting out the poster board)
Hot glue gun.
3 Hanger wires (it’s super sturdy)
Pencil, and eraser.
Iron.
GLITTER!!!!!!!!!
Step one:
Find a reference photo! These wings are meant for a Periwinkle cosplay but since her and Tinkerbell have the same wings we used Tink as a reference.
Step Two:
Since we made our wings super large we had to glue two pieces of poster board together. This is why I said 6 pieces for large wings. Reason why is because of their size just one piece would make it droop. So before drawing the design on you spray one piece with adhesive and put the other piece on top of it. Making it as even as possible.
If you’re making smaller wings just go to step three!
Step Three:
Draw your design on the poster board. We drew ours on from corner to corner (diagonally) If you want smaller wings I recommend drawing it from corner to the the middle of the board.
Step four:
This is the most tedious of all the steps to making wings. Take your exact o knife and start cutting. You cut around the design but make sure to cut half an inch away from the line. You can go back later to make it thinner if you want. Using one poster board will take less time then two since it isn’t as thick.
Make sure there is something underneath the board so you don’t damage your floor.
Step Five: (not necessary but who says no to glitter)
We’re obsessed with glitter. So naturally we coated both sides of the design with white glitter. We used adhesive for this as well.
Step Six: (Smaller wings don’t need this but if you want to add it then go ahead!)
Take your wire hanger and bend it out so it’s the same shape of the wing that will be the closest to your back. Glue the wire down about 7 inches down from the tip of the wing. Most of the support is needed in the middle, and bottom of the wing.
Let some of the wire hang out of the bottom about four inches so you can connect the harness.
Step Seven
Roll out the cellophane to go over the wings. One piece for each side. Spray adhesive to the wing first and then gently place the cellophane over it. I recommend having someone help you with this part because adhesive is a pain when something goes wrong.
Do this for both the big wing, and the smaller one. Make sure the cellophane is over the wing evenly. Pat out any bubbles it may have.
Step Eight:
When both sides have cellophane on it take your iron and make sure it’s on a low setting. You don’t want it to burn or melt the cellophane. Gently go over the wing, and even it out as much as possible. There will be some bubbles, and such but think of it being more realistic.
Step Nine:
Cut off any excessive cellophane but leave some near the veins and by the wire. If it’s to short the cellophane will come apart. We left little less then half an inch.
Step Nine:
Take the adhesive to glue the little wing to the bigger one. You want to make sure you glue it on the inside.
Step Ten:
Use another wire hanger and bend it into a rectangle. Wire hanger is tough to bend so you’re going to have to use your inner strength. Cut off any excess wire with a wire cutter. Cover it with electrical tape so it becomes sturdier.
 Step Eleven:
Line up the wing wire with the harness wire at the spot where it’s needed. Take the wing and connect it to the harness. Using electrical tape to keep the two of them together. Cut off an excess wire so it doesn’t dig into the wearers back.
Alas you have fairy wings!! I hope this helps a bit T-T Have fun!
Tip: You may have to cut a slit in the back of your outfit for the wings to slip into. Wearing a bra helps because it goes underneath it.

damianrules:

I said I’d write up a tutorial on how to make these wings. It’ll be terrible So, here goes. XD

Have one or two friends to help you out. It’s easier with more hands.

Materials:

Thin poster board. (For small wings you will need 3 pieces. For wings like this you will need 6)

Opal cellophane. (two rolls to be safe)

Adhesive glue.

Scissors.

Wire cutters.

Exacto knife. (I recommended using this for cutting out the poster board)

Hot glue gun.

3 Hanger wires (it’s super sturdy)

Pencil, and eraser.

Iron.

GLITTER!!!!!!!!!

Step one:

Find a reference photo! These wings are meant for a Periwinkle cosplay but since her and Tinkerbell have the same wings we used Tink as a reference.

Step Two:

Since we made our wings super large we had to glue two pieces of poster board together. This is why I said 6 pieces for large wings. Reason why is because of their size just one piece would make it droop. So before drawing the design on you spray one piece with adhesive and put the other piece on top of it. Making it as even as possible.

If you’re making smaller wings just go to step three!

Step Three:

Draw your design on the poster board. We drew ours on from corner to corner (diagonally) If you want smaller wings I recommend drawing it from corner to the the middle of the board.

Step four:

This is the most tedious of all the steps to making wings. Take your exact o knife and start cutting. You cut around the design but make sure to cut half an inch away from the line. You can go back later to make it thinner if you want. Using one poster board will take less time then two since it isn’t as thick.

Make sure there is something underneath the board so you don’t damage your floor.

Step Five: (not necessary but who says no to glitter)

We’re obsessed with glitter. So naturally we coated both sides of the design with white glitter. We used adhesive for this as well.

Step Six: (Smaller wings don’t need this but if you want to add it then go ahead!)

Take your wire hanger and bend it out so it’s the same shape of the wing that will be the closest to your back. Glue the wire down about 7 inches down from the tip of the wing. Most of the support is needed in the middle, and bottom of the wing.

Let some of the wire hang out of the bottom about four inches so you can connect the harness.

Step Seven

Roll out the cellophane to go over the wings. One piece for each side. Spray adhesive to the wing first and then gently place the cellophane over it. I recommend having someone help you with this part because adhesive is a pain when something goes wrong.

Do this for both the big wing, and the smaller one. Make sure the cellophane is over the wing evenly. Pat out any bubbles it may have.

Step Eight:

When both sides have cellophane on it take your iron and make sure it’s on a low setting. You don’t want it to burn or melt the cellophane. Gently go over the wing, and even it out as much as possible. There will be some bubbles, and such but think of it being more realistic.

Step Nine:

Cut off any excessive cellophane but leave some near the veins and by the wire. If it’s to short the cellophane will come apart. We left little less then half an inch.

Step Nine:

Take the adhesive to glue the little wing to the bigger one. You want to make sure you glue it on the inside.

Step Ten:

Use another wire hanger and bend it into a rectangle. Wire hanger is tough to bend so you’re going to have to use your inner strength. Cut off any excess wire with a wire cutter. Cover it with electrical tape so it becomes sturdier.

Step Eleven:

Line up the wing wire with the harness wire at the spot where it’s needed. Take the wing and connect it to the harness. Using electrical tape to keep the two of them together. Cut off an excess wire so it doesn’t dig into the wearers back.

Alas you have fairy wings!! I hope this helps a bit T-T Have fun!

Tip: You may have to cut a slit in the back of your outfit for the wings to slip into. Wearing a bra helps because it goes underneath it.

(via staticcatfish)

wings reference

Milestone Reward: How to Make Your Own Problem Glyphs, A Tutorial

problemglyphs:

This tutorial is a milestone reward from the Problem Glyphs Patreon campaign and was made possible by the support of its patrons. I want to emphasize how life-changing this project is for me, solely because of your investment in my drawings, financial and otherwise. Thank you.

This tutorial is in text format rather than video because I find it difficult to draw while trying to follow a video (I have to keep pausing and rewinding), and because accessibility for Deaf and Hard of Hearing readers, as well as Blind and Low Vision people who are using screen readers, is important to me.  Let me know if I can help with accessibility in other ways.

Problem Glyphs started in November of 2013 as a response to one of those popular “ask meme” posts on Tumblr. I (and glyph poet Elias IKB) tell the whole story to a journalist here, so if you’re interested in more in-depth backstory, that’s the place to go. Right now I’m going to show you how to make your own problem glyphs, at any level of drawing ability, with the tools you have on hand.

Read More

reference to do

Anonymous asked:

Could you maybe explain the 5 color, 5 textures in a bit more detail? Not just why it's important but how to go about it properly?

Toothy Critters Answer:

crowtoed:

Sure! Basically it’s five colors and/or five textures. Difference in color or texture makes costumes more interesting and appealing to look at. And it’s not just the garments themselves- hair, makeup, jewelry, and detailing like embroidery and trim count as colors/textures. When you’ve got a combination of both, people spend more time studying your cosplay/costume, studying you, and appreciating the work that went into it. 

One of my biggest pet peeves as a costumer is when cosplayers use the same fabric/texture for an entire outfit, including accessories. While animators and designers are bound to color palettes (particularly in animation) to make the work feasible (this is why a lot of characters have solid or unadorned clothing) you are not. I’m sorry friend, but you’re not a cartoon. You’re a person. And while you can make yourself LOOK like a character AND mimic the style of media (like some brilliant Borderlands cosplayers) most people don’t- which leads to flat looking costumes on three-dimensional people.

Guzzardi cosplay did this awesome Handsome Jack, which included cell-style shading on the outfit and makeup.

Of course, there are variations on the rule. If you’ve got a LOT of colors going on, then the texture variation doesn’t have to be as great. Ditto for a lot of texture and little color variation. There can be too much of a good thing and a lot of times, that’s how to look like a hot mess…. so 5’s a handy middle of the road.

Then there are exceptions, like minimalist designs. For example, there aren’t a lot of color or texture variations for gajinka designs of GLaDOS because the contrast and shape are enough visual interest and conveys ‘robot’ rather than ‘person’. Similarly if a costume has a very complex cut or tricky fitting, that can be the visual motif or interest- for example, Stacker Pentecost.

image

(And there was a great homina throughout the land….) See, even without five different textures and colors, there’s enough going on with the detailing and the cut to create interest. SO. MUCH. INTEREST.

Anyhue, how to use this practically. 

For example- take Katara from Avatar the Last Airbender:

You could do her costume all from cotton broadcloth which is perfectly fine- particularly if you’re a beginner cosplayer or sewer. But we’re trying to create some more visual interest and organic quality. A good thing to do is break down the costume: So tunic, necklace, armwraps, pants,shoes.

Then break it down into colors: tunic body, tunic trimming and belt, pants, shoes, armwraps, necklace.

At this point, the trick is not to use the same texture twice, or at least not noticeably. How about we make the tunic body out of cotton flannel, then trim it in a faux suede? Or maybe the armwraps out of a cotton gauze, the pants out of unwaled (non-grooved) corduroy, and the tunic out of linen? Use your inner character developer and ask- what kind of materials would this character have access to? Are they rich or poor? From a hot or a cold climate?

I wouldn’t make Katara’s whole tunic out of satin. but her necklace band could be. Just like (to use another Avatar example) I wouldn’t make Zuko’s clothes out of plainer woven fabrics.

Remember that texture doesn’t necessarily mean expensive! With a little planning, you could use cheaper cottons and basic materials for the large pieces with smaller amounts of more expensive materials for the trimmings. (Like making Katara’s tunic from cotton, but trimming it in slubbed dupioni silk or some nice linen or a suiting).

Also don’t be afraid to add trimming! Instead of plain bias tape binding, how about velvet ribbon? Piping is a great way to add visual interest and it’s pretty cheap! Or if you have accessories, try a bit of weathering for texture.

There are a ton of ways to use the 5/5 rule and not look like a circus or stick to a pre-developed character design. I hope this helped a bit!

reference